Rock Candy

A photographer selling unreleased photos of Nirvana as NFTs has received criticism for doing so and has addressed the backlash.

As previously reported, the photos/NFTs in question come via photographer Faith West from Nirvana’s October 1, 1991 show at J.C. Dobbs in Philadelphia. These Nirvana NFTs are available via PopLegendz.com and will be up for grabs on February 20, which also marks what would’ve been Kurt Cobain’s 55th birthday. Half the proceeds will go to The Trevor Project in support of at-risk LGBTQ+ youth while a portion of the remainder of sales will benefit Grid Alternative, which provides solar power resources to working/poor families.

West leaped into action via Pop Legendz official Twitter after Loudwire shared their story about the Nirvana NFTs, which received a number of negative replies in response to the news. West shared a number of the same replies to critics. One of them was, “I’m the photographer-doing the sale in what I hope is the best way. After I take some $ to make up for salary I’ve lost during COVID I’m giving the rest to The Trevor Project for suicidal LGBTQ youth & Grid Alternatives to get solar to working poor families.”

Another was, “Hey, I get why you are suspicious of my project. I’m also a Nirvana fan, and I’m respectful of you and all fans defending Kurt’s memory. There’s been a lot to hate about the way he’s been ‘remembered’ since his death. My project is a little different, so I hope you’ll hear me out…NFTs, for all their downsides, allow artists to retain copyright & make a little royalty off all future sales. We make so little for our labor. Right-clicking & copying has made slaves of so many artists. NFTs have given us back some dignity.”

In one exchange that criticized how much energy is used in creating an NFT, West responded in part, “For what its worth, I’m researching the environmentally sensitive blockchains for future.”

 

 


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Erica Banas is a rock/classic rock news blogger who's well versed in etiquette and extraordinarily nice.